Kendal News and Blog

Intergenerational Tai Chi

Kendal at Oberlin - Friday, April 01, 2011

Because Tai Chi works on the inside of the body it helps to relieve the sense of inner turmoil so many of us feel. It can alleviate stomachaches, nervousness, fear, anger and frustration.

Tai Chi slows us down so we can think and feel. It is not complicated. It doesn't have to be done exactly right. There is no competition. No race to be first. No need to be best. The important thing is to relax, feel the energy and find a feeling of peace. As we slow down, the internal energy can flow to all parts of the body. The visualization is peaceful. There is a nice warm feeling inside.

Kids are the embodiment of change, and change can be very stressful. Their minds and bodies grow at phenomenal rates, so they are constantly having to work with new and different bodies, making coordination and balance a big issue. Tai Chi, with its emphasis on balance, is well suited to address all these challenges.

Tai Chi works to integrate the mind and body, skeletal and muscular systems, and left brain and right brain. In physical terms, this centering is built around an awareness of moving with good posture and from a low center of gravity, or the vertical axis.

So what does all of this mean for your child? Well, in this instance, your child will be part of a unique intergenerational experience where we are trying to blend the energies of the young child with the energies of mature adults. The calm, grounded nature of mature adults blended with the energetic, curious nature of children should produce an interesting Tai Chi experience for all.

Everyone will be learning eight easy exercises that we will repeat. These exercises are called the Eight Pieces of the Silken Brocade. I have modified them so that people in wheelchairs can do them easily. The children will learn the feet/body movements of the standing version. Most of all, this is a time for your child and for the residents to enjoy some time together in a meaningful way; using movement as the common factor.